Welcome!
We are the Association for Japanese Tradition & Culture located in Los Angeles, California.

Membership and Benefits

Receive invitations to our annual members gatherings, events, lectures, and workshops.

Advance notice and reservation privileges to Club-sponsored programs and events.

News about the Club, programs and services, plus member updates and articles by experts in the U.S.-Japan field. A discount fee on programs and events.

The AJTC maintains an active calendar offering a diversity of programs that help promote better understanding between Japan and America.

The Association for Japanese Tradition & Culture (AJTC) is a nonprofit organization with a mission of educating the public regarding Japanese tradition and culture. We organize events and social gatherings which promote Japanese culture. Examples include food and cooking workshops, traditional ceremonies, handicrafts, calligraphy, ikebana, music, film, Japanese baseball and other arts unique to Japan. We aim to serve as a bridge across cultural borders, leading our members toward a deeper appreciation and understanding of Japanese tradition & culture through our association's activities.



Latest news and events

May 8, 2017

Mochi Making

Mochi are rice cakes traditionally made by pounding a variety of rice known as mochigome with a large wooden mallet. The result is a paste that's formed into shapes such as blocks. Mochi are an ingredient in a wide variety of simple foods and are extremely popular. Much like bread, it's rare to meet someone who doesn't like mochi.
May 7, 2017

Floating Lanterns

The Japanese tradition of floating lanterns in rivers, known as Toro Nagashi is a ceremony that represents the journey of souls to the afterlife. It's used to celebrate the Japanese Obon holiday, a time of year when it's believed that the spirits of loved ones return to the world. Toro Nagashi ceremonies are also used to commemorate tragic events such as the Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima.
May 6, 2017

Doll Floating

Hina Nagashi, or Doll Floating, is an increasingly rare ceremony in Japan that floats traditional Japanese dolls out to sea or down a river. It was historically believed that bad luck could be transfered from children into the dolls and cast out to sea. Hina Nagashi is still performed on Girl's Day in Japan at several shrines including Awashima Shrine in Wakayama.

The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others



- Thomas Shultz